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Oklahoma moves into the Top Ten nationally
for highway bridge conditions


On Aug. 13, 2020, Gov. Kevin Stitt and Secretary of Transportation Tim Gatz announced that Oklahoma has become a Top Ten state nationally for highway bridge conditions. This includes bridges on non-tolled interstates, U.S. highways and state highways maintained by the Oklahoma Department of Transportation.

Progress toward 2020

In 2004, Oklahoma was ranked 49th nationally for highway bridge conditions. In last year’s bridge conditions report submitted to the Federal Highway Administration in April 2019, for the inspection year ending 2018, Oklahoma reported 132 structurally deficient or poor bridges out of the 6,749 on the highway system. This placed Oklahoma at 13th place, just outside of the Top Ten.

In this year’s bridge conditions report submitted in April 2020, for the inspection year ending 2019, Oklahoma reported 86 structurally deficient or poor bridges on the highway system. This moved Oklahoma to 9th place, a Top Ten State.

Source: Federal Highway Administration National Bridge Inventory

Timeline of Bridge Progress

  • 1990s-Early 2000s: Many national reports rank Oklahoma near the bottom in bridge conditions, including one in 2000 that ranked Oklahoma’s interstates at 47 out of 50

  • May 2002: I-40 Webbers Falls Disaster forces interstate traffic to detour on rural state highways, bringing heightened attention to Oklahoma’s poor bridge conditions

  • October 2002: Oklahoma Transportation Commission approves first ODOT Eight-year Construction Work Plan, an accountable plan that is updated annually to address the most pressing highway and bridge needs in a fiscally responsible manner

  • April 2004: Bridge inspections show 1,168 out of 6,800 total highway bridges are rated structurally deficient, an all-time high for Oklahoma

  • June 2004: When compared with other states’ inspection reports, Oklahoma is ranked 49th nationally in highway bridge conditions

  • May 2005: House Bill 1078 approved, creates Rebuilding Oklahoma Access and Driver Safety Fund and provides annual allocation of income tax revenue to ROADS Fund
  • September 2005: State Question 723 to increase state motor fuel taxes to fund highway improvements rejected by 87% of voters in the most lopsided defeat in state history because they wanted to tap existing transportation revenues

  • March 2006: Senate Bill 1288 appropriates $100 million for emergency bridge work; ODOT is able to address 137 load posted bridges, including many that were previously unable to carry loaded school buses

  • May 2006: House Bill 1176 approved, provides annual increase in ROADS Fund allocation

  • August 2007: I-35W Minnesota Bridge Disaster brings national attention to structurally deficient bridges

  • October 2011: Gov. Mary Fallin announces the Bridge Improvement and Turnpike Modernization Plan, which calls on the Legislature to increase ROADS Fund allocations to allow ODOT to address all remaining 706 structurally deficient bridges by end of the decade

  • January 2012: ODOT opens new at-grade I-40 Crosstown in downtown Oklahoma City, replacing the state’s longest structurally deficient bridge

  • May 2012: House Bill 2248 approved, provides incremental annual increases to the ROADS Fund to implement Bridge Improvement and Turnpike Modernization Plan

  • August 2017: American Road and Transportation Builders Association recognizes Oklahoma for replacing more structurally deficient bridges than any other state in past decade since I-35W Minnesota Bridge Disaster

  • April 2019: Gov. Kevin Stitt announces that Oklahoma is just outside of the Top Ten for good bridge conditions nationally and hopes to be there in the next year

  • May 2019: ROADS Fund reaches the $575 million annual cap set by HB 2248 for the first time

  • April 2020: Bridge inspection reports show only 86 structurally deficient bridges remaining on highway system

  • August 2020: Gov. Kevin Stitt announces that FHWA data shows that Oklahoma is now ranked 9th for good highway bridge conditions nationally

SD Bridge Chart 2019



Frequently Asked Questions

How many bridges does ODOT maintain?
ODOT is responsible for nearly 6,800 bridges on the highway system, which includes non-tolled interstates, U.S. highways and state highways.

What is a structurally deficient bridge?

A “structurally deficient” bridge requires significant maintenance and repair to remain in service and eventually will require major rehabilitation or replacement to address the structural health of the bridge.

Why do so many national reports say Oklahoma’s bridges are in poor shape?
Most national news reports combine all state, city and county roads and bridges together, even though they’re maintained by different levels of government. The State of Oklahoma is responsible for the 6,800 bridges on the highway system. There are nearly 16,000 bridges on local roads that are the responsibility of cities and counties.

How often are bridges inspected?
Federal law requires all bridges on public roads must be inspected at least once every other year. Some bridges are inspected more often depending on their condition.

Where does this bridge inspection data come from?
Federal law requires states to oversee inspection of all bridges on public roads and report the data to the Federal Highway Administration each spring. ODOT, cities and counties have contracts with various engineering firms to conduct bridge inspections statewide.

How many structurally deficient bridges has ODOT addressed since 2004?
While addressing the 1,168 structurally deficient bridges identified in 2004, ODOT also performed work on hundreds of additional bridges that became deficient. Nearly 1,600 total structurally deficient bridges have been replaced or rehabilitated since 2004, with 86 remaining on the highway system.

Does these mean ODOT is finished with highway bridges?
Absolutely not! All bridges must be properly maintained after construction to remain in good condition. Additionally, more than 1,000 existing highway bridges are 80 years old or older and must be addressed in the coming years; however, ODOT now has a sustainable plan in place to maintain its bridges.

What’s being done about city and county bridges?
Local bridges not on the highway system are under the jurisdiction of cities and counties, which receive state motor fuel tax and motor vehicle collections revenue and have access to some federal funds, as well as local tax revenue. In 2006, the Legislature created the County Improvements for Roads and Bridges (CIRB) program, which provides designated state funding administered by ODOT for high-priority county projects that no single county could fund on its own.

Structurally Deficient Bridges - Before and After

Before and After

Eastern Oklahoma - SH-51 over Barren Fork Creek in Cherokee Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 2 beforeBefore


Top Ten Bridge - Div. 2 afterAfter

Southeastern Oklahoma - SH-1 over Rock Creek in Latimer Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 3 before Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 3 after After

South-central Oklahoma - US-77/SH-39 Purcell-Lexington Bridge in McClain & Cleveland counties

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 4 urban before Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 4 urban after

After

Oklahoma Co. urban - I-35 over Deep Fork Creek

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 5 rural before Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 5 rural after After

Western Oklahoma – SH-152 over Sweetwater Creek in Beckham Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 6 before Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 6 after After

Northwestern Oklahoma – SH-15 over Turkey Creek in Woodward Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 7 before Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 7 after After

Southwestern Oklahoma – SH-79 over the Red River in Jefferson Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 8 rural before

Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 8 rural after

After

Northeastern Oklahoma – US-59 over Russell and Elm Creeks in Craig Co.

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 8 urban before

Before

Top Ten Bridge - Div. 8 urban after After

Tulsa Co. urban – I-44 over 165th E. Ave.


For a list of scheduled ODOT bridge projects, view the FFY 2020-2027 Eight-year Construction Work Plan.

For information on all bridges on public roads in Oklahoma, visit ODOT's Map & Data Portal.

Last Modified on Oct 21, 2020
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