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Fact Sheets


 This site contains HIV prevention messages that might not be appropriate for all audiences. Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs on this website may address these topics. If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please exit this website.


This page provides basic data regarding HIV/STDs in Oklahoma, and includes links (green titles) for more detailed data.

NOTE:  Oklahoma HIV/STD Data runs one year behind.

Chlamydia

  • The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had the largest percentage of Chlamydia cases at 38.5%, while rural areas had a percentage of 30.3%.
  • In 2018, a total of 21,974 cases were reported.
  • 69.6% of the reported cases in 2018 were among females (15,282 cases), while 30.4% were males (6,692 cases).
  • Age group 20-24 years of age had the most cases of all age groups at 8,005 cases, or 36.4% of syphilis across all the age groups.
  • Whites made up 39.9% of Chlamydia cases.*

 *While Whites had the most cases of chlamydia in 2018, they are not disproportionately impacted based on race or ethnicity. This occurs when the proportion of a given population affected by the morbidity (disease/illness) is greater than the same proportion of the population in a given area during a certain time period, such as Oklahoma in 2018. An example would be, the proportion of Blacks/African Americans who were diagnosed with chlamydia in Oklahoma, in 2018.


Gonorrhea

  • The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area had the largest percentage of Gonorrhea cases at 39.9%, while Tulsa MSA had 28.1% of total cases.
  • In 2018, a total of 8,998 cases were reported.
  • 50.6% of the reported cases in 2018 were among females (4,556 cases), while 49.4% were males (4,442 cases).
  • Age group 20-24 years of age had the most cases of all age groups at 2,461 cases, and a percentage of 27.4% .
  • Whites made up 38.8% of Gonorrhea cases.*

  *While Whites had the most cases of gonorrhea in 2018, they are not disproportionately impacted based on race or ethnicity. This occurs when the proportion of a given population affected by the morbidity (disease/illness) is greater than the same proportion of the population in a given area during a certain time period, such as Oklahoma in 2018. An example would be, the proportion of Blacks/African Americans who were diagnosed with gonorrhea in Oklahoma, in 2018.   


Hepatitis 

ACUTE - Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) & Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

HBV

  • In 2018, a total of 50 cases were reported and confirmed as acute HBV in the state of Oklahoma.
  • 44.0% of these cases were among males, while 56% were females.
  • 36% of the acute HBV cases were among ages 50 years and over.
  • Whites had the highest numbers of acute HBV in 2018.
  • 26% of acute HBV cases reported using needles for street drugs and 22% reported receiving a tattoo.

HCV

  • In 2018, there were 54 cases reported and confirmed as acute HCV in the state of Oklahoma.
  • 50% of these cases were among males, while 48.1% were females.
  • 22.2% of the acute HCV cases were 30-34 years old.
  • Whites made up 64.8% of acute HCV cases.
  • The majority (55.6%) of acute HCV cases reported a history of using needles for street drugs.  

 

CHRONIC - Hepatitis B Virus & Hepatitis C Virus

HBV

  • In 2018, there were a total of 466 cases of Chronic HBV in Oklahoma.
  • 56.9% of these cases were among males, with 42.3% among females.
  • 48.3% of the total cases were among persons aged 50 and over.
  • Whites made up 33.9% of these cases.

HCV

  • In 2018, there were a total of 4,609 cases of Chronic HCV in Oklahoma.
  • 67.7% of these cases were among males, with 31.2% among females.
  • 45.8% of the total cases were among persons aged 50 and over.
  • Whites made up 57.2% of these cases.

  *While Whites had the most cases of hepatitis in 2018, they are not disproportionately impacted based on race or ethnicity. This occurs when the proportion of a given population affected by the morbidity (disease/illness) is greater than the same proportion of the population in a given area during a certain time period, such as Oklahoma in 2018. An example would be, the proportion of Blacks/African Americans who were diagnosed with hepatitis in Oklahoma, in 2018.  


Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

  • In 2017, 302 cases of HIV were newly diagnosed in Oklahoma.  Of these cases, 82.8% (250 cases) were male and 17.2% (52 cases) were female.
  • 37.7% of the newly diagnosed cases were ages 20-39 in Oklahoma in 2017 (114 cases).
  • Whites had the highest number of newly diagnosed HIV cases in 2017 (41.1%).
  • Of the newly diagnosed cases, 53% (160 cases) self-reported as MSM (Men who have Sex with Men).
  • In 2017, 75 AIDS cases were newly diagnosed in Oklahoma.  Of these cases, 85.3% (64 cases) were male and 14.7% (11 cases) were female, and 40% were diagnosed only 1-4 years after their HIV diagnosis.
  • At the time of AIDS diagnoses, the 30-39 year age group accounted for the highest number (28.2% or 22 cases) of newly diagnosed AIDS cases in 2017.
  • Whites had the highest number of newly diagnosed AIDS cases in 2017 (32 cases or 41%), with Blacks accounting for 29 cases (or 37.2%).
  • 46.2% of the newly diagnosed AIDS cases were diagnosed among people who self-reported MSM, while among people who self-reported Heterosexual it was 16.7%.
  • At the end of 2017, an estimated 6,163 people were living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Oklahoma. 
  • Males accounted for 5,097 PLWHA in Oklahoma, while females accounted for 1,066 PLWHA.
  • The highest number of PLWH were between 20-29 years of age (1,388 people), while the highest number of PLWA were between 30-39 years of age (1,030 people).
  • In 2017, Whites had the highest number of PLWHA at 3,332 people.
  • Of the 6,163 PLWHA in 2017, people who self-reported MSM were 3,435, while 751 people self-reported Heterosexual .

  *While Whites had the largest numbers of newly diagnosed and people living with HIV/AIDS in 2017, they are not disproportionately impacted based on race or ethnicity. This occurs when the proportion of a given population affected by the morbidity (disease/illness) is greater than the same proportion of the population in a given area during a certain time period, such as Oklahoma in 2017. An example would be, the proportion of Blacks/African Americans who were diagnosed with HIV in Oklahoma, in 2017. 

PRESENTATIONS (pdf format)


Syphilis

  • A total of 531 cases of Primary & Secondary (P&S) Syphilis were reported in 2018.
  • 72.8% of the P&S Syphilis cases were among males (387 cases), while 27.1% (144 cases) were female.
  • The self reported risk/exposure of Heterosexual contact accounted for 54.% of the P&S Syphilis cases reported in 2018.
  • Age group 30-34 years of age had the most P&S Syphilis cases in 2018 at 108 cases.
  • Whites had the highest number of P&S Syphilis cases at 279 (52.5%).
  • A total of 342 cases of Non-Primay Non-Secondary Syphilis were reported in 2018.
  • 68.1% of these cases were among males, while females made up 31.8% of these cases.
  • The age group of 25-29 years had the largest number and percentage of cases at 59 people and 25.1%, in 2018.
  • Heterosexual contact was reported as the highest risk/exposure for these cases at 181 people and 52.9%, in 2018.

  *While Whites had the most cases of primary & secondary syphilis in 2018, they are not disproportionately impacted based on race or ethnicity. This occurs when the proportion of a given population affected by the morbidity (disease/illness) is greater than the same proportion of the population in a given area during a certain time period, such as Oklahoma in 2018. An example would be, the proportion of Blacks/African Americans who were diagnosed with primary & secondary syphilis in Oklahoma, in 2018.  


2017 Data

HEPATITIS:

STDs:


2016 Data

HEPATITIS:

 HIV/AIDS:

STDs:

 


2015 Data

HEPATITIS:

HIV/AIDS:

STDs:

 


If you are in need of specific data and it is not part of the fact sheets or you have questions, please contact SHHR Surveillance at 

405-271-4636 or CLICK HERE to send an email.

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